The Holiday Preparedness Toolkit is here!

“Winter weather headed your way this holiday?  When The Sky  Turns Grey…Prepare now w/ this video: http://bit.ly/1t0tQzK #PrepareAthon”

“Old man winter may have a surprise for you this holiday! #PrepareAthon helps you receive his gift”

Be Smart. Know Your Hazard

Winter storms can occur anywhere and bring freezing rain, ice, snow, high winds or a combination of all these conditions. They can cause power outages that last for days or weeks; making it hard to keep warm and making travel very dangerous. For more information on how to prepare for winter storms, download the How to Prepare for a Winter Storm Guide which provides the basics of winter storms, explains how to protect yourself and your property and details the steps to take now so you can stay safely where you are in case of a winter storm.

Winter Storm Basics

  • WHAT: A winter storm occurs when there is significant precipitation and the temperature is low enough that precipitation forms as sleet or snow, or when rain turns to ice. A winter storm can range from freezing rain and ice, to moderate snowfall over a few hours, to a blizzard that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures.
  • WHEN: Winter storms can occur from early autumn to late spring depending on the region.
  • WHERE: Winter storms and colder than normal temperatures can happen in every region of the country.

Know the Risk

Do you want to have a better understanding of the risk for winter storms in the area you live? Below are two maps that present the frequency of winter storms and abnormally cold days between 1996 and 2013 as identified by data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Frequency of Winter Storm Events By County: 1996-2013

Map Information: The map is titled, “Frequency of Winter Storm Events By County: 1996-2013.” It depicts a map of the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska, and Hawaii and illustrates state and county boundaries. It includes data from the NOAA/NCDC Storm Events Database and shows the total frequency of occurrence of all events identified as blizzards, heavy snow, ice storm, lake-effect snow, winter storm or winter weather, as identified by NOAA.
A FEMA logo is in the lower right corner of the map indicating that the map was prepared by ORR Mapping and Analysis Center, Washington, DC on 7/29/14 and the Sources are ESRI, HSIP, and USGS.
Map description: The frequency of winter storms from 1996 to 2013 is represented by five color coded categories. The first category (represented by white) includes counties that have recorded an average of one or fewer of the listed storm types per year. The areas of the United States in this category include all of Puerto Rico, Florida and Louisiana; the southern portions of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, and Arizona; and portions of North and South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Idaho, Montana, Washington state, Oregon, Alaska, and Hawaii.
The second category (represented by pale blue) includes counties that have recorded an average of one to four storm events per year. The primary area of the United States in this category extends from central New York, south to northern South Carolina, west to northern Texas, and north to southern North Dakota. Additionally, portions of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington state, Oregon, California, Alaska, and the rest of Hawaii are included.
The third category (represented by blue-green) includes counties that have recorded an average of four to eight storm events per year. The areas of the United States in the category include all of Rhode Island, most of Connecticut, and portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, Washington state, Oregon, California, and Alaska. Additionally, the rest of South Carolina, Tennessee, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, and Kansas are included.
The fourth category (represented by navy blue) includes counties that have recorded an average of 8 to 12 storm events per year. States with counties in this category include most of Massachusetts; large portions of Arizona, Maine, Vermont, New Jersey, New York; and small portions of Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Utah, Washington state, Oregon, California, and Alaska.
The final category (represented by blue-black) includes counties that have recorded an average of more than 12 storm events per year. The areas of the United States in this category include most of Maine; large portions of New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Alaska; and small portions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Michigan, Minnesota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Washington state, Oregon, California, and Alaska.

Frequency of Abnormally Cold Days Per Year By County: 1996-2013

Map Information: The map is titled, “Frequency of Abnormally Cold Days Per Year By County: 1996-2013.” It depicts a map of the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska, and Hawaii and illustrates state and county boundaries. It includes data from the NOAA/NCDC Storm Events Database and shows the frequency of occurrence of all events identified as cold/wind chill or extreme cold/wind chill, as identified by NOAA.
A FEMA logo is in the lower right corner of the map indicating that the map was prepared by ORR Mapping and Analysis Center, Washington, DC on 7/29/14 and the Sources are ESRI, HSIP, and USGS.
Map description: The frequency of abnormally cold days from 1996 to 2013 is represented by five color coded categories. The first category (represented by white) includes counties that have recorded an average of fewer than one day every six years. The areas of the United States in this category include most states in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the U.S. The area extends from Pennsylvania south to Florida and Puerto Rico; west to Texas, and north in a line from Oklahoma to Michigan; north from New Mexico to South Dakota, and then west to the coast. In addition, all of Hawaii is included. In total, about three-quarters of the United States are included in this group.
The second category (represented by pale blue) includes counties that have recorded an average between one day every six years and one day every two years. States with counties in this category include most of Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota; large portions of Maryland, Michigan, Illinois, Kentucky, Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming; and small portions of Vermont, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Indiana, Ohio, Missouri, South Dakota, Texas, Montana, Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Washington state, Oregon, California, Nevada, and Alaska.
The third category (represented by blue-green) includes counties that have recorded an average between one day every two years and one day every year. States with counties in this category include large portions of New York, Vermont, Michigan, North Dakota, and Wyoming; and small portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Delaware, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Alabama, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, north Texas, Montana, Colorado, California, and Alaska.
The fourth category (represented by navy blue) includes counties that have recorded an average of more than one day every year. States with counties in this category include large portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Nebraska; and small portions of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Alabama, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, Montana, Wyoming, and California.
The final category(represented by blue-black) includes counties that have recorded an average of more than one day every year, plus more than one extreme cold/wind chill day every year. The areas of the United States in this category include the remaining large portions of Maine and Alaska; and small portions of West Virginia, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

Additional Resources

For more information on protecting yourself from severe winter weather and protecting your property and belongings, download these helpful resources:

  • Be Smart-Know Your Alerts and Warnings: The factsheet provides a brief summary of the various alerts and warnings available from Federal, state, local governments as well as the private sector that you can sign up for to stay informed and be ready to take action to be safe.
  • Be Smart-Protect Critical Documents and Valuables: The checklist helps you to take an inventory of your household documents (e.g., financial and medical records), contacts, and valuables.

 

 

http://www.community.fema.gov/connect.ti/AmericasPrepareathon/view?objectId=3229520

 

Levy Playground Community Input Meeting

Thursday, December 4, 2014

7:00 p.m.9:00 p.m.

Through the Community Parks Initiative, NYC Parks is spending $130 million to rebuild and re-imagine 35 community parks across the city, including at Levy Playground in Port Richmond, Staten Island. We will upgrade playgrounds, ball courts, green spaces and more, using 21st-century designs and materials. To do this, we need your input and feedback on local needs, and your ideas on how this playground can better serve the neighborhood.

Please join us to share your ideas for improving Levy Playground.

Registration for this event is encouraged, but not required.

Location

Faber Park Field House in Faber Pool and Park

2175 Richmond Terrace

Staten Island

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO: CPI Levy Scoping Meeting Flyer English – Color

Port Richmond Avenue’s “RETAIL SHOWCASE”

For Immediate Release:

Owners are showcasing their properties for Port Richmond Avenue’s

“RETAIL SHOWCASE” & YOU ARE INVITED !!!

Join the tour of retail-ready commerical space. Learn about resoures available for small businesses and the exciting changes that are in store for Port Richmond!

WHERE/WHEN:  453 Port Richmond Avenue – Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 10:00 AM

Northfield Community LDC, with support from the NYC Department of Small Business Services, is showcasing a series of “move-in-ready” retail storefronts along the Port Richmond commercial corridor.

With a presentation by NYC Small Business Solution Center, perspective business owners will have an opportunity to hear about the resources and support this agency has to offer.

Businesses located in Port Richmond have the advantage of working with established organizations to help them grow and thrive. “Northfield Community LDC has provided much support to the Port Richmond Board of Trade over the past three decades and we welcome all those interested in locating their business here to attend this exciting showcase event. The Port Richmond Avenue commercial district has served many generations of Staten Island residents and we continue to nurture its current potential”, described Joan Catalano, Northfield Community LDC Executive Director.

Port Richmond commercial corridor, once known as the “Fifth Avenue of Staten Island”, is destined for a renaissance. We welcome entrepreneurs, local property owners, and real estate industry professionals to join us on our tour.

The event’s program is designed to attract new and diverse businesses to the neighborhood by simplifying entrepreneur’s search for retail space and providing property owners with a means of advertising their available commercial spaces. With the recent approval of the Ferris Wheel, the Empire Outlets, combined with the Staten Island Yankee Stadium, momentum is building for development of the North Shore waterfront. With views of the waterfront and the Bayonne Bridge, the Port Richmond Corridor is in an area rich in history. We are on the cusp of something extraordinary. With visions of artist galleries, coffee houses, restaurants, and stores along the hub, Port Richmond will someday be the go to place for cultural diversity.

Here are some of the Businesses we are looking for…
• Art galleries, coffee cafe, dance studio, gym, thrift shop or a goodwill store, variety shop, hardware store, furniture and home furnishing stores, catering hall, and restaurants.

Here are links to our Discover Port Richmond Facebook Page, Port Richmond Avenue’s “RETAIL SHOWCASE” Event Page, and Discover Port Richmond Blog:

For more information or to register for this event please call:
Kathleen Sforza
Phone:  718-442-7351, Ext. 225
e-mail:  NorthfieldLDC.kathleensforza@gmail.com

New Jersey soil dump raises pollution concerns on Staten Island

 

New Jersey soil dump raises pollution concerns on Staten Island

new-jersey-soil-dump-raises-pollution-concerns-staten-island

By David Giambusso 5:14 p.m. | Jun. 12, 2014 follow this reporter
Opponents of New Jersey’s Rahway Arch Project told the City Council today that piling up as much as 29 feet of contaminated soil near a flood plain at the mouth of the Rahway River threatens to pollute parts of Staten Island.

The Rahway Arch site, in Carteret, N.J., is a former chemical byproduct waste disposal site owned by American Cyanamid which for decades served as a dumping ground for acidic sludge and aluminum sulfate.

In 2010, Rahway Arch Properties bought the site and ordered an environmental evaluation. The company decided to import two million tons of petroleum-laced soil that would be processed at a temporary, on-site facility and act as a cap for the toxic sludge beneath.

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy and ever-increasing threats of flooding in the area, New York City legislators and environmental leaders warned today that the soil and sludge from the Rahway Arch could drift into the Arthur Kill and onto western shore of Staten Island, causing significant air and water quality problems for residents in New York and New Jersey.

“Concerns by local residents about flooding, increased truck traffic and polluted runoff were ignored by the state of New Jersey in their quest to approve the project,” said Debbie Mans, executive director of NY/NJ Baykeeper, an environmental advocacy group. “The Christie administration even waived its own Flood Hazard Area Rules to permit the project.”

Officials from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection were called to testify at today’s hearing—held jointly by the Council’s environmental protection and wetlands committees—but did not attend.

“This is unfortunate,” said Staten Island Councilwoman Deborah Rose, who chairs the wetlands committee. “It’s an affront because it impedes our ability to understand more about this project and how it will impact many of my constituents and residents of New York City.”

Bob Considine, a spokesman for the New Jersey D.E.P., said his office had provided extensive background to the Council and had numerous talks with officials regarding the project.

“D.E.P.’s sole role in the Rahway Arch project and other projects like it is to determine whether it meet’s the state’s environmental, engineering and technical standards and requirements, and not to appear at a meeting to possibly be perceived as an advocate or an opponent to a project,” Considine said in an email to Capital. “After thorough evaluation, D.E.P. has determined this project is an acceptable approach for eliminating the current contamination from the former American Cyanamid site to groundwater and the Rahway River.”

Those who did attend today’s hearing were universally against the project.

“We are entering a period where regulators don’t have the tools and in some cases don’t have the political will to do their jobs,” said Paul Gallay, president of Riverkeeper, a clean water advocacy group. “Do not let this happen without proper evaluation ahead of time.”

Kathleen Sforza, a member of the Northfield Community Local Development Corporation, a Staten Island group, said pollution from Rahway Arch threatens a Staten Island “rejuvenation” that is just starting to take hold.

“Staten Island already suffers from environmental contamination due to the long history of industrial land uses in New York and New Jersey,” she said. “New Jersey is not acting neighborly. Staten Island is trying to rejuvenate the waterfront … this is like a step backward.”

EastStar Environmental Group is the licensed site remediation professional (LSRP) for the Rahway Arch project. The group sent written testimony asserting the plan to import soil was designed to protect local waters from pollution by the toxic sludge already on the 125-acre property.

Albert Free, EastStar’s president, wrote that the imported soil would be used in a cement mixture to cap the facility and prevent more toxic emissions from the existing landfill.

“No solid, toxic or hazardous waste will be brought to the site,” Free wrote but added later that six polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons would be part of the capping materials but would be “less than 40 percent of the average concentrations of these six compounds that already exist on the site today.”

That didn’t seem to comfort Linden, N.J., resident Judy England McCarthy who also testified today.

“It doesn’t make sense where you already have a pollutant and say you’re going to bring another pollutant in and cap it,” she told the committee members. “That’s not a recycling plant, that’s a dumping plant.”

She said public calls to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and the New Jersey D.E.P. to stop or at least better evaluate the project had fallen on deaf ears.

“They’re not interested in what we feel as citizens. They’re looking for immediate gratification. The money’s there for them now and morally that’s terrible,” McCarthy said. “Every year I pay my taxes. So where is the money going if not to represent me and my neighborhood.”